Intelligent Internet Use Journal

Discussion in 'Internet Addiction' started by Rob, Nov 22, 2015.

  1. Rob

    Rob New Member

    Hi everybody,

    Rob here. Trying to give up unintelligent internet usage. I think it's fine as long as I'm using the internet and it's not using me, ya dig? This is hard, and that is a good reason to do it. But I also think it's good because it will hopefully make me more independent. I'm also trying to give up PMO. Since this is going to be a more difficult one to draw the line with, I think I'm going to be pretty strict.

    The Rules:
    1. Never use the internet

    Exceptions:
    1. Checking email and messages and assigned homework at most once per day
    2. Posting on this forum at most once per day (I may look at other categories on this website, too. But since I don't want to get caught up in mindlessly browsing, I will say that I am allowed to look at at most one other thread than my own threads)
    3. Using the internet to reset my counter(s) in case if I ever relapse in anything
    4. Using the internet strictly for research purposes when required for school/work (this one is rarely needed, as I usually research with books)
    5. When someone else needs to show me something on the internet. Otherwise, I will not prompt the need to spend any more time on the internet.

    I'm really excited about this, as I've basically been able to give up video games without much conscious "cold-turkey" mentality over the last few years (with a couple relapses). I'm certainly not dependent upon them anymore. Oh yeah, one more rule:

    No videogames

    Since they are basically the same thing as mindlessly searching on the internet, I will not play them. What should I make the rule if I'm around people playing video games without being vague? I suppose I should say that I will not watch them play video games ever and if I am distracted from whatever I am doing by the videogames, I will simply relocate. This would not count as a relapse.

    Hopefully, once I give up unintelligent internet use, I can find more ways to completely expel digital devices from my life and get back to simplicity.
     
  2. John Thevan

    John Thevan Guest

    Re: Giving up the Internet Journal

    What a coincidence, I've been doing the same thing you were doing for a week or so. Here are my guidelines: Others think I'm crazy.

    1. No music
    2. No T.V
    3. No Video games
    4. Do not carry your cellphone on you. Leave your cellphone at your house and only use it at the end of the day.
    5. Only check your email at the end of the day (10:00pm).
    6. Only use the computer for school work (since I'm in college) or the browse the forums (~15 minutes maximum).

    I've been doing this for a week and I've noticed that my concentration has improved drastically. I have also been able to study more effectively and retain the material. I'm also living the most amish, unconnected lifestyle on a college campus. Everyone else thinks I'm crazy.

    Think you can do what I do?

    (No pornography and masturbation is implied)
     
  3. Rob

    Rob New Member

    Re: Giving up the Internet Journal

    I like this, man. The video games and the TV are basically implicit for me, since I'm no longer dependent on those things. Heck, I should really spend more time watching TV, haha. I never really carry my cell phone around except for email. Perhaps I could be less addicted to email...I think that the spending fifteen minutes on the forum as a goal is a good one, since I find myself clinging to writing this post since it's all my internet time for the day. I only would disagree only with the music part--for myself, that is. I try to listen to challenging music like jazz or classical, so that's never been like a dopamine issue.

    Good luck with your reboot(s), man!

    Today I woke up and felt the need to use the internet. Here I am on it. It's hard to avoid checking your email so much! I've already deleted my Facebook account--that was months ago--and I think it has made me much less cynical about people.
     
  4. John Thevan

    John Thevan Guest

    Re: Giving up the Internet Journal

    The deletion of facebook was very crucial to my happiness.

    "You're seeing other people's highlight reel and comparing it to your dull life."

    Seeing other people with their partners, vacations, and general political opinions always made me feel depressed and aggravated. This one time especially when I saw this girl whom I had a crush on enter a relationship with this guy who used to bully me.

    (Bully killed himself and they broke up so I guess I should feel sad?) ;)

    But yeah social media is one of the greatest distractions of our generation.
     
    CardinalTetra likes this.
  5. Complex

    Complex Member

    Re: Giving up the Internet Journal

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=trVzyG4zFMU
     
  6. Rob

    Rob New Member

    Re: Giving up the Internet Journal

    Complex--that's a great video. It's amazing that someone can go that long without it. I hope we get the same thing!

    Don Draper--it's without a doubt that the deletion of social media has made me happier. I remember that I used to go on Facebook and just look at the profiles of people I thought were happier than me, and then Facebook would give me their updates on the news feed, and I would just hate and hate--haha, it was like a positive feedback loop of negativity. I used to think of getting rid of Facebook in like a holier-than-thou-art way, but now I just tell people that I got rid of it because it's not cool anymore or something.

    After my first full day without the internet. Wow--I hadn't realized that I use the internet to squelch my fear of death. I totally overuse symptom checkers and google all of my symptoms. Last night I just had to confront my own irrational fear of death. That was crazy. I also had the urge to look at porn to escape from those fears. I didn't, and I woke up today earlier and with more energy! Things are beginning to fall into place. Now I need to cultivate a hardness that allows me to be okay with a few setbacks. I'm not counting touching myself yesterday as a relapse--not to say I'm going to try to spend my time doing that. I also want to get rid of this compulsion to confess everything that probably comes from my Catholic upbringing. A therapist once told me that I tended to do that. Haha.

    So the first things it seems the internet and porn got rid of were:
    1. Boredom
    2. Fear of death
    3. Anxiety of being lonely
    4. Sexual appetites

    I read a lot yesterday and got lots of work done. Today, I'll do even more! Let's see what else I relied on the internet for...
     
  7. John Thevan

    John Thevan Guest

    Re: Giving up the Internet Journal

    Agreed, are you a student in college or high-school? My productivity skyrocketed. I'm also able to concentrate throughout entire lectures, retain material that I have just outlined and overall understand concepts much faster than I generally would.
     
  8. Rob

    Rob New Member

    Re: Giving up the Internet Journal

    College--I have to do so much reading for class and I read an entire book and about half of a novella yesterday--something I never would have done without giving up the internet. My attention span is naturally increasing and books are becoming more interesting and spring to life in my imagination more readily now. My reading comprehension seems a tad bit better, too. Either that's because I'm rereading or my mind is more focused on the material. It's only been two days! I also want to push toward limiting myself only to activities that are non-time-wasting. If I could finish off all of my work, then I could start to spend more time on the things that really interest me most. I could get to the gm again, work on my piano and guitar skills, read more, etc. It will be glorious!
     
  9. Rob

    Rob New Member

    Re: Giving up the Internet Journal

    I had tons of energy yesterday. I don't really like the internet to begin with, so my desires have been pretty tame, but I only realize I use the internet like kind of a pervert. So far, the things I recall being urged to use the internet for were:

    -looking at porn
    -checking email like an email junkie
    -looking up "how to" guides
    -watch videos
    -share videos with other people
    -satisfying my phallic obsession by thinking about having a larger penis and then looking up images of them, thinking somehow that this will make me closer to having a larger member. I don't know where this irrational thinking emerges, but I am hoping it goes away on its own after a period of withdrawal
    -googling my symptoms to curb my fear of death
    -boredom
    -anxiety of loneliness
    -I used to use Facebook to just look at other people's profiles and hate em. Fortunately I killed my Facebook Profile months ago.

    Here's a tip if you really want to quit Facebook without any chance of going back. It'll work better if you have a big profile, too: DOn't just deactivate, but unfriend everyone on your profile first, untag yourself from every picture, delete all of your information, and everything. That way, Facebook can no longer be reactivated with a login, but you'll have to recreate your entire profile and somewhat embarrassingly re-friend everyone you knew before. This was the only worked for me to quit Facebook, anyway. I hope it works for you! You may experience what I like to think of as a sort of phantom wound for awhile when you boot your internet, just because you might start checking your email more, this forum, or rely on some other crutch.

    I guess that's how most people use it though, anyway. All this amazing technology and we don't use it to its full potential. I feel so motivated to do things in books and on paper now that I've given up the internet. All of my physical space, rather than my digital space, must now be meticulously organized. I've enjoyed this aspect of rebooting--or, rather, unplugging.
     
  10. John Thevan

    John Thevan Guest

    Re: Giving up the Internet Journal

    Nice work on deactivating facebook. Welcome to the "out of the loop" lifestyle. Now try quitting the internet ::). Also, cool, I too play piano and guitar. One thing I have done is whenever I get the urge to go on the internet or take a break from studying, I keep my guitar next to me that way I can easily jump in and destress.
     
  11. Rob

    Rob New Member

    Re: Giving up the Internet Journal

    No internet is getting easier for me, it seems. I have ore energy for other activities, but now I want to get off of this forum and go spend time with my family. Yesterday and the day before, I reordered the house into looking more organized. Now I must do the same thing with my time management.
     
  12. Rob

    Rob New Member

    Re: Giving up the Internet Journal

    Five days. I hope I'm not cheating. I've been on the computer doing strictly job and internship research. I find this to be very intelligent use of the internet. I am trying not to be too OCD about this. I found that I used the internet for entertainment, escape, and to get away from fears. I made a Linkedin profile today. That was good use of the internet, but it felt like making a Facebook Profile and I can see how someone would want to spend a ridiculous amount of time finagling with it. Perhaps I'll change the name of this thread to "using the internet intelligently journal" since I've been online. Still, I would greatly prefer not to have to use it ever. I want these devices out of my life! They control me. I think I need to take my focus off of the devices themselves. It was a mistake to say that I would check my email once per day and post on this forum once per day. I love this community because it offers such great support, but it's somewhat ironic how we're all trying to grow independent from it. Hmm. At least it serves me with reflection time. I'll have to ponder this. Either that, or I just need to be much more strict with my time allocation on the computer and internet. Yes. That is the solution. I am glad that this post helped further my progress. I must simply follow my schedule exactly as written and learn to obey it during the day, but command it when I author it at night.

    New Rules:
    Use internet only when directed by schedule, and only to complete goal as listed beforehand
    That is, I may only use the internet with a clear goal in mind pertaining to work, school, or this message board. Use it as little as possible.

    That way, I'll go into the internet time with a specific goal lain out. I will not get side-tracked by extra emails.
     
  13. Rob

    Rob New Member

    Well I just used the internet for entertainment (not porn or arousal-related). I have been looking up lots of things on the internet and over-checking my email and Linkedin profile, to the point where I feel it counts as a relapse. I think that I need to draw clearer lines in my internet use.

    New rules (this means the old rules are out)
    1.No smartphone use allowed at all. People can contact me by email if they need me.
    2.No internet use at all
    Exceptions: -Check email, this forum, my school's website for work, and anything pertaining to jobs/internships once per day maximum, and maximum time allowed fifteen minutes total
    -If I ever relapse on anything

    Those are the new rules--let's test them out and see if it makes it clearer or if I have to go even further to kick this habit of incessantly checking the internet and email...
     
  14. Rob

    Rob New Member

    I keep relapsing. I need to take my attention off of the computer and re-orient myself to what really matters rather than just zoning out with technology.
     
  15. John Thevan

    John Thevan Guest

    A suggestion, since I only have a laptop, after I'm done with my work I shut it down and pack it away usually on top of my dresser or in my closet. Not only is it the out of site and out of mind mentality, but it also gives me more space on my desk.
     

Share This Page